Improvement of Self-Injury With Dopamine and Serotonin Replacement Therapy in a Patient With a Hemizygous PAK3 Mutation: A New Therapeutic Strategy for Neuropsychiatric Features of an Intellectual Disability Syndrome.

TitleImprovement of Self-Injury With Dopamine and Serotonin Replacement Therapy in a Patient With a Hemizygous PAK3 Mutation: A New Therapeutic Strategy for Neuropsychiatric Features of an Intellectual Disability Syndrome.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsHorvath GA, Tarailo-Graovac M, Bartel T, Race S, Van Allen MI, Blydt-Hansen I, Ross CJ, Wasserman WW, Connolly MB, van Karnebeek CDM
JournalJ Child Neurol
Volume33
Issue1
Pagination106-113
Date Published01/2018
ISSN1708-8283
Abstract

PAK3-related intellectual disability is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the p21-activated kinase (PAK) protein. It is characterized by mild to moderate cognitive impairment, micro/normocephaly, and a neurobehavioral phenotype characterized by short attention span, anxiety, restlessness, aggression, and self-abusive behaviors. The authors report a patient with a novel PAK3 mutation, who presented with intellectual disability, severe automutilation, and epilepsy. His magnetic resonance imaging changes were most likely secondary to lacerations from parenchymal contusions. His behavior was difficult to manage with behavior interventions or multiple medications. After finding low levels of dopamine and borderline low serotonin metabolites in the spinal fluid, treatment with low dose L-dopa/carbidopa and 5-hydroxytryptophan significantly improved his self-injurious behavior. This is the first case of PAK3-related intellectual disability presenting with severe self-injury with improvement following treatment. The patient's response to neurotransmitter replacement therapy raises the question if this treatment intervention might help other individuals suffering genetic syndromes and self-injurious behaviors.

DOI10.1177/0883073817740443
Alternate JournalJ. Child Neurol.
PubMed ID29246092