Quantifying preferences for asthma control in parents and adolescents using best-worst scaling

TitleQuantifying preferences for asthma control in parents and adolescents using best-worst scaling
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsUngar WJ, Hadioonzadeh A, Najafzadeh M, Tsao NW, Dell S, Lynd LD
JournalRespir Med
Volume108
Issue6
Pagination842-51
Date Published06/2014
ISSN1532-3064
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding the views of parents and children is critical to designing effective asthma management programs. It was hypothesized that parents and adolescents would exhibit heterogenous preferences with regard to asthma control.

METHODS: Fifty parents of children with asthma and 51 adolescents with asthma participated in a best-worst scaling study to quantify preferences regarding night-time symptoms, wheezing/chest tightening, changes in asthma medications, emergency visits and physical activity limitations.

RESULTS: A latent class analysis revealed heterogeneity inherent in the preferences of parents and adolescents. Two classes of parents emerged from the analysis that displayed significantly different preferences. The first displayed strong preferences for averting night-time symptoms, wheezing/chest tightening, physical activity limitations and emergency room visits with odds ratios (OR) of 42 (95% CI 24, 72), 40 (95% CI 23, 68), 26 (95% CI 15, 44) and 21 (95% CI 12, 35), respectively, compared to an OR of 1 for 10 physical activity limitations per month. A second smaller parent class displayed more balanced preferences. Most adolescents displayed similar preferences for averting night-time symptoms, wheezing/chest tightening, physical activity limitations and emergency room visits, with ORs of 28 (95% CI 16, 48), 25 (95% CI 14, 44), 27 (95% CI 15, 46) and 20 (95% CI 11, 34) respectively.

CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed the importance placed on averting night-time symptoms, wheezing and chest tightening, emergency room visits and physical activity limitations by parents and adolescents alike, with greater emphasis on symptom aversion by parents. Preference heterogeneity exists and should be considered in customized asthma management programs.

DOI10.1016/j.rmed.2014.03.014
Alternate JournalRespir Med
PubMed ID24780719