Faculty Profile

Kate Johnson

MSc, PhD
Assistant Professor (grant tenure-track)

Other Affiliations

Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine

Contact Information

Primary Phone Number (206) 234-2030
Email Address kate.johnson@ubc.ca
Office 4624, Pharmaceutical Sciences Building

Accepting Graduate Students

Yes

Selected Publications

Johnson KM, Sadatsafavi M, Adibi A, Lynd LD, Harrison M, Tavakoli H, Sin DD, Bryan S. Cost-Effectiveness of Case Detection Strategies for the Early Detection of COPD. Applied Health Economics and Health Policy. 2021;19:203-215.

Johnson KM, Khakban A, Bryan S, Sin DD, Sadatsafavi M. Healthcare system encounters before COPD diagnosis: a registry-based longitudinal cohort study. Thorax. 2020;75(2):108-115.

Sadatsafavi M, Ghanbarian S, Adibi A, Johnson KM, FitzGerald JM, Flanagan W, Bryan S, Sin D. Development and Validation of the Evaluation Platform in COPD (EPIC): A Population-Based Outcomes Model of COPD for Canada. Medical Decision Making. 2019 Feb;39(2):152-167.

Johnson KM, Safari A, Tan WC, Bourbeau J, FitzGerald JM, Sadatsafavi M. Heterogeneity in the respiratory symptoms of patients with mild-to-moderate COPD. International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. 2018;13:3983-3995.

Johnson KM, FitzGerald JM, Tavakoli H, Chen W, Sadatsafavi M. Stability of Asthma Symptom Control in a Longitudinal Study of Mild-Moderate Asthmatics. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. 2017;5(6):1663-1670.

About

Kate Johnson is an assistant professor with a joint appointment in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine. She completed her PhD in the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in health economics at the Comparative Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (CHOICE) Institute at the University of Washington.

Dr. Johnson is a health outcomes researcher specializing in simulation modeling and comparative effectiveness evaluation with applications to respiratory disease. The overarching themes of her research are real-world evidence generation to understand disease trajectory and patterns of care, followed by simulation modeling to evaluate healthcare interventions for reducing the burden of disease on patients and the healthcare system. This work incorporates methods from epidemiology, health economics, and data science, applied to practical questions for improving the delivery of healthcare and effectiveness of interventions in respiratory medicine. Her current work is focused on the development of a whole disease model of asthma that will be used to evaluate a wide range of strategies for prevention and early intervention.